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1992



CANON RC-560/570– 1992.   The RC-560/570 still video camera used a 1/2 inch, 410,000 pixel CCD image sensor and Hi-band specification to produce images with horizontal resolution of 450 TV lines.  3X zoom and integral automatic flash.  An optional recording interface daughterboard for the Mac NuBus card could give the additional flexibility of converting digital images to analog and recording them with the camera. This would allow downloading a computer-generated presentation onto a video floppy from Aldus Persuasion or similar package (including photos originally taken by the electronic camera), as a series of video slides.  When transferred into the computer, the pictures were digitized into 24-bit color or 8-bit grayscale tiff or pict files.  The Canon RC-570 sold for $3,400. The Mac kit (RC-560) with NuBus digitizer board was $4,100 including the camera.  Adding the digital-to-analog output daughterboard cost $400. The camera plus external video floppy drive package was $5,900 for the Mac; $6,650 for Next; $6,350 for Microchannel computers; and $6,250 for at-bus pcs.

http://www.canon.com/camera-museum/history/canon_story/f_index.html


CANON ION RC-360 AND SV-PV - 1992.    The RC-360 was a battery-powered still video camera with a -inch, 260,000 pixel CCD image sensor.  Horizontal resolution of 380 TV lines.  The RC-360 could record up to 50 images on a miniature floppy disk.  All of the outputs were analog.  Downloading images into a computer required a digitizer such as the Canon SV-PC digitizer board shown on the bottom of the right photo.  Price, $2,600.

http://www.canon.com/camera-museum/history/canon_story/f_index.html


DYCAM MODEL 3 (Logitech Fotoman Plus) - 1992.  24 bit color (when using an optional color filter system) or gray scale.   495 x 366 pixel CCD.  ASA 200.  Shutter 1/30 to 1/2000 second.  Fixed-focus lens.  Internal storage up to 32 photos. MSRP $695.

http://www.encylopedia.com/doc/1G1-20588598.html


 
 

FUJI DS-H2 - 1992. 1/2-inch 390K pixel CCD. 2X lens.  Shutter 1/4 to 1/750 second.   Memory card stored up to 40 images.  Built-in autoflash, autofocus, and autoexposure control.  Popular Photography, January 1993, p47.

FUJI HC-1000 IMAGE CAPTURE CAMERA - 1992. Three 900K pixel CCDs, 1280 x 960 pixel image. This camera was generally used for medical research purposes. Photo-Electronic Imaging, October 1982, page 50. MSRP $32,000 (approx $52,000 in 2011).

INTERNET PHOTO BROWSER - 1992.  The National Center for Supercomputing Applications released Mosaic, the first browser enabling users to view photographs over the web.  The National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), is a unit of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

http://en.wikipedi.org/wiki/Mosaic_%28web_browser%29


KODAK DCS 200 - 1992.   The DCS 200 had a built-in hard drive for image recording.  On sale from 1992 to 1994, it was based on the Nikon N8008s.  There were five variants of the DCS200: DCS 200 ci (color and integrated hard disk), DCS 200 c (color without internal hard disk), DCS 200 mi (black and white and integrated hard disk), DCS 200 m (black and white without internal hard disk) and the 'Wheelcam' (color by a triple green red and blue exposures).  Resolution with the Kodak DCS 200 Digital camera was 1.54 million pixels, providing four times the resolution of still-video cameras at that time. Kodak's fully digital systems used a Nikon body and optics to capture the image. The image was then transferred to a CCD that converted the image directly into digital information. The CCD in the Kodak DCS camera system only used a small portion of the angle of view compared to conventional cameras; for example, a 28mm lens on the Kodak DCS Digital Camera was equivalent to an 80mm lens on a 35mm camera.  The exposure index (EI) of the DCS camera equated to 50 to 400 IS0 for color images and 100 to 800 IS0 for black-and-white images. 

http://membres.lycos.fr/ncf/N2BE10.html


KODAK DM3 and DC3 SYSTEMS – 1992.  Included the DM3, DM3/B, DM3/32, DC3, DC3/B, and DC3/32.  1280 x 1024 CCD.  ISO for each system was either 200 to 1600 or 400 to 3200.  Shutter 1/8 to 1/2000 second.  These systems used an external modem and accessory keyboard to transmit images.  Image compression allowed the storage of 400-600 photos.  Pixel Photography, Robert McMahan, 1993, p88.  Click on image to see enlarged view.

www1.harenet.ne.jp/.../ plink/pl42/pl4212.htm

FIRST DIGITAL CAMERA BACKS - 1992. Leaf and Phase One marketed the first digital camera backs in 1992. The original CCD chips made color images by taking three separate exposures through a color filter wheel containing red, green and blue filters. Used for studio still-life. The Leaf DCB with color filter wheel is shown above on a Hassel blad 553ELX.

http://www.epi-centre.com/reports/9906cs.html

http://db.audioasylum.com/cgi/m.mpl?forum=bottlehead&n=108258&highlight=Leaf+DCB+1+Doc+B.&r=&session=

 



LOGITECH Fotoman Plus (Dycam Model 3)  - 1992.  24 bit color (when using an optional color filter system) or gray scale.   495 x 366 pixel CCD.  ASA 200.  Shutter 1/30 to 1/2000 second.  Fixed-focus lens.  Internal storage up to 32 photos.  MSRP $695.

http://www.encylopedia.com/doc/1G1-11674290.html

MINOLTA MS-C 1100  - 1992.  Still video camera. 1/2 inch CCD, 360K pixels. ISO 100-200. Shutter 1/2 sec - 1/2000 sec and bulb. Required the use of Minolta DAT recorder MS-R 1100 as the camera had no independent recording ability. 12,000DM in Germany. Not sold in U.S. Photo-Electronic Imaging, October 1992, page 50.

www.mhohner.de/ minolta/bodies.php



RICOH DC-10 - 1992.   Prototype memory card camera.  Popular Photography, May 1992, p52.


SONY ProMavica MVC-7000 - 1992.    Professional SLR, 3 CCD chip still video camera.  The MVC-7000 accepted lenses designed for Nikon or Canon bayonet mounts.  It had through-the-lens (TTL) viewing, a hot shoe, choice of center weighted or spot metering, and variable ISO.  An 8mm to 48mm zoom lens was standard.   MSRP $8000.

http://www.sonicvideo.com/stillvideo/file1.htm

SONY MVR-5600 - 1992.    Still video recorder that would be used to record and playback images taken with the MVC-7000 or other still video cameras.

 

1992
 

1800s
1900 - 1920
1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980-83
1984-85
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995 A-C
1995 D-Z
1996 A-C
1996 D-N
1996 O-R
1996 S-Z
 1997 A-D
1997 E-H
1997 I-O
 1997 P-Q
 1997 R-S
1997 T-Z
1998 A-D
1998 E-F
1998 G-K
1998 L-N
1998 O-P
1998 Q-R
1998 S
1998 T-Z
1999+
   



Useful Info
History Sites
FINDER