1800s
1900 - 1920
1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980-83
1984-85
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995 A-C
1995 D-Z
1996 A-C
1996 D-N
1996 O-R
1996 S-Z
 1997 A-D
1997 E-H
1997 I-O
 1997 P-Q
 1997 R-S
1997 T-Z
1998 A-D
1998 E-F
1998 G-K
1998 L-N
1998 O-P
1998 Q-R
1998 S
1998 T-Z
1999+
   



Useful Info
History Sites
FINDER

1989        R

DIGICAM (Digital Camera) - 1989.  The first use of the word digicam that we have found was as a trademark name owned by J & G Coughtrie Ltd Montrose Avenue, Hillington, Glasgow, G52 4LZ, United Kingdom, dated 6 January 1989 (trade mark number UK00001369395), but it is no longer in effect.

https://www.ipo.gov.uk/tmcase/Results/1/UK00001369395

http://www.yourdictionary.com/digicam

http://www.wordsense.eu/digicam/



konica kanpai voice activated camera red 1989
konica kanpai voice activated camera black KONICA KANPAI - 1989.  Konica's Kanpai was the world's first voice activated camera and would automatically swivel on its built-in tripod to take snapshots wherever it heard a burst of sound like laughter or cheers. The original 1989 model was red, later models were black.   "Products to Watch," Fortune.  Mar. 25, 1991.

 

MACINTOSH PROFESSIONAL IMAGE PROGRAM - 1989.  Letraset released Color Studio 1.0, the first professional image manipulation program for Macintosh computers.

http://www.fotomuseum.ws/archive/photo/timeline/decade/1975.htm



 

 

MEGAVISION TESSERA - 1989.  The first Tessera system went into regular use in early 1989 at a commercial photo studio in Minneapolis (Photo Mechanical Services, Inc.). Shooting 4 Megapixel images in a production photo studio, believed to be the world's first professional digital camera system.  Many thanks to John Cox of Megavision for providing these very rare photos to DigiCamHistory.Com.  We believe we were the first digital camera history web site to provide a photo and information concerning this camera.

http://www.mega-vision.com/index.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MegaVision_%28cameras%29



nintnedo dmg-01 game boy 1989 

NINTENDO GAME BOY - 1989. Model DMG-01, the first Game Boy, was released in 1989.

http://www.gizwizsearch.com/episode-595.html



KODAK ECAM - 1989. In 1989, Steve Sasson and a colleague, Robert Hills, created the first modern digital single-lens reflex (S.L.R.) camera that looks and functions like today's professional models. It had a 1.2 megapixel sensor, and used image compression and memory cards. But Kodak's marketing department was not interested in it. Mr. Sasson was told they could sell the camera, but wouldn't because it would eat away at the company's film sales. The 1989 version of the digital camera, known as the Ecam (electronic camera) was the basis for a United States patent issued on May 14, 1991. Until it expired in the United States in 2007, the digital camera patent helped earn billions for Kodak, since it was not Mr. Sasson who owned it, making most digital camera manufacturers pay Kodak for the use of the technology. Though Kodak did eventually market both professional and consumer cameras, it did not fully embrace digital photography until it was too late.  In 2012 Eastman Kodak filed for bankruptcy.

http://www.brw.com.au/p/tech-gadgets/made_this_kodak_employee_invented_QnYp4iCrFXYwagdCRzszeP

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/08/12/kodaks-first-digital-moment/?_r=0

http://www.google.com/patents/US4131919

https://www.google.us/patents/EP0289944A1?cl=zh



kodak hawkeye II digital camera front 1989kodak hawkeye II digital camera rear 1989

KODAK HAWKEYE II INTEGRATED IMAGING ACCESSORY DIGITAL CAMERA - 1989. This camera was a follow-up of the 1988 Kodak digital Tactical Camera which was tethered to a shoulder pack. The Hawkeye II integrated camera replaced the shoulder pack with a housing attached to a Nikon F3 body and thus was more suitable for demonstrating this new digital technology. Images were stored in DRAM on an Image Storage Module that plugged into the side of the camera. Images were either four of 1280 x 1024 pixels or sixteen of 640 x 512 pixels. It was designed by Kodak's James McGarvey, lead engineer in Kodak's Federal Systems Division who kindly supplied the above photo and information. Renae Sanger did the mechanical design drawings. Bruce Crosman and Joanne Schieyer designed the circuit boards which were hand assembled by Tom McCarthy. Much more information concerning this and other early Kodak DSLRs can be seen on Mr. McGarvey's web site at http://jemcgarvey.com

kodak hawkeye II tethered digital camera 1989

KODAK HAWKEYE II TETHERED IMAGING ACCESSORY DIGITAL CAMERA - 1989. This was a tethered version of the above camera

.

pcmcia memory card 1989
PCMCIA - 1989.   Personal Computer Memory Card International Association, an international standards body founded to establish standards for Integrated circuit cards and to promote interchangeability among mobile computers.

http://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/PCMCIA


 ROLLEI ROLLEIFLEX-6000 - 1989.  Seen on eBay in February of 2017, a never produced prototype mock-up.  Asking price was $7,500.

http://www.digicammuseum.com/en/prototypes-rarities/item/rollei-digital-scan-body-prototype


sanyo svc-05 stillvision prototype still video camera 1989
SANYO STILLVISION SVC-05 - 1989.   Prototype electronic still camera.  390K CCD.  Programmed auto-exposure, auto-flash, auto white balance, Shutter speed up to 1/2500 second.  MSRP $800.  Click on image for enlarged view.  Popular Photography, March 1989, p53.   We believe we were the first digital camera history web site to provide a photo and information concerning this camera.

  http://www.digicammuseum.com/en/esvc/item/sanyo-svc-05-1989


sony promavica mvc-2000 still video camera 1986    
SONY ProMavica MVC-2000, 2000PF, 2010 - 1989/90.  The MVC-2000PF was a pre-production, hand-built camera sent to specific photographers for testing.  The production model went on sale in 1989.   This analog still video camera had a 13X zoom lens and was available only in NTSC.  It was a one-CCD camera of 2/3-inch and 380K pixels.  48mm to 288mm f/1.4 zoom lens.  Shutter 1/15 to 1/1000.  MSRP in 1989 of $3,395.   We believe we were the first digital camera history web site to provide a photo and information concerning the MVC-2000PF.

The MVC-2000PF pre-production proofing version of the MVC-2000 is thus extremely rare.  In the past, Sony often hand-built prototypes of upcoming cameras and distributed them to a few individuals for testing prior to commencing full production. Those prototypes had the PF designation added to the normal model number.  Cameras such as the Nikon QV-1000C which were produced in very small numbers (about 180 units for the QV-1000C) sell for astronomical prices among collectors due to their rarity, however, even 180 units could be considered mass production compared to the small number of hand-built prototypes such as the MVC-2000PF. Such being the case, there is virtually no limit on the price a PF version might sell for at auction.


This was one of my luckiest purchases ever.   Another potential bidder (see above email) who was aware of the rarity of the PF version, but was out of town at the time of the sale.  In 2017, a standard production versions of the MVC-2000 was going for $400 or more.  The value of a PF version, only one of  which I have seen on eBay in the past twenty years, would be hard to guess.

The MVC-2000 production version went on sale in 1989 and the MVC-2010, a slightly modified version of the MVC-2000 which included audio record capability, went on sale in 1990.

Images recorded on the mini discs could be viewed on a TV through use of the still video player. Basic Digital Photography, Norman Breslow, 1991, p79.

A word about dates.  While the exact date of the PF version cannot be absolutely proven, It is obvious that a camera that went on sale in 1989 had to be in the works years before that, especially at this early time in the development of electronic cameras.   Exactly when the hand-built PF version was constructed is of little relevance, what is relevant is that it did and does exist.  Since the 2000PF is merely and updated, hand-built version of the Sony MVC-A7AF of 1986, it is probable that is was constructed in 1986-1988.  Whenever possible, we use the earliest known date for a camera rather than the on-sale date.  Oftentimes, cameras have been shown or discussed a year or two before actual marketing, sometimes as much as four years beforehand.  The reason we mention this is that some sites make a really big issue of camera dating even though they also state that the first known date is the most important one, but then oftentimes show a date that is known to be the on-sale date rather than the first known date.  In the case of the 2000PF, one site makes a big issue of the 1986 date while at the same time inferring that the PF version did not exist at  all.  A rather questionable claim considering that the label on the carton states MVC-2000PF, as does the sticker on the bottom of the camera.  An error in dating, if it exists, is of little consequence to anyone, but stating that a camera never existed is a major research error and one of significant consequence.  This is at least the second time that the operator of this particular site has stated that a camera never existed and then had to eat his words.  As to the use of Hi-band by the MVC-2000PF, the Hi-band standard was in the works well before it was implemented in 1988.  Knowing this, Sony could have used Hi-band on the PF version in 87 or 1988 since they intended it to be on the marketed version in 1989.  In any case, making a major issue of the date of a camera that you believe never existed seems to be rather unusual logic to say the least

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sony_Mavica

http://www.digicammuseum.com/en/esvc/item/sony-mvc-2000

http://www.digicammuseum.com/en/esvc/item/sony-promavica-mvc-2010


 

tianamenm square chineses student uprising 1989
SONY DIH 2000 DIGITAL IMAGE HANDLER - 1989.  The DIH2000 could capture single frame images from any video source, motion or still video cameras, and transmit them over standard phone lines in as little as ten seconds.  Sony won a special Emmy Award, ��€š��€œStill-Picture Transmission Technology for News,��€š�� honoring Sony for its development of still-picture transmission capabilities, particularly as it related to the 1989 student uprising in Tianamen Square, China.  During the demonstrations the Chinese government blocked the transmission of live video.  News networks were forced to send their video tapes to Hong Kong for transmission thereby delaying their broadcasts by more than twelve hours.  CCN sent a crew into the field using a Sony Mavica still-video recording system and sent their images over the Chinese telephone system to CNN's U.S. studios.  CNN delivered images to its audience many hours ahead of the competition.  Effects of those still images on American and European audiences was electrifying.  ��€š��€œThe Day The Image Stood Still, Paul Saffo, Personal Computing,  February 1990, p59.  Digital Photography: Pictures of Tomorrow, John Larish, 1992,  p4, p141.  We believe we were the first digital camera history web site to provide a photo and information concerning this item. 

sony dih2000 digital image handler in gulf warsony dih 2000 digital image handler front  1989sony dih 2000 digital image handler rear 1989
The DIH 2000 and Sony still video camera (ProMavica MVC-5000) were also used during the Persian Gulf War by the U.S. Army to transmit photos to the Army Media Services Branch in Washington, D.C.

sony mvc-5000 promavica 1989
SONY ProMavica MVC-5000 - 1989.  The Sony ProMavica MVC-5000 (MAVICA = Magnetic Video Camera) still-video camera.  The MVC-5000 was the first to transmit almost instantaneous still color images over phone lines using Sony DIH2000 noted above and was the camera used by the CNN crew in China to transmit the Tienemen Square images. The ProMavica recorded images as magnetic impulses on a compact 2-inch still-video floppy disk.  The images were captured on the disk by using two CCD (charge-coupled device) chips.  One chip stored luminance information, and the other separately recorded the chrominance information.  This camera provided a 720,000-pixel image. The images could be stored on the floppy disk either in Frame or Field mode.  When Frame was selected, each picture was recorded on two tracks and up to 25 images could be recorded on each disk.  When Field was selected, each picture was recorded on only one track, allowing up to 50 images to be recorded.  When recorded in the Field mode, images were less detailed as compared to images recorded in the two-track Frame mode.  The MVC-5000 was considered to be the leader in image quality during its time.  The MVC-5000 recorded still video hi-band resolution at 500 TV lines versus the standard 360 lines of most other still video cameras of that period. Images could be shown on a TV by using the Sony MVR-5500A shown below.   MSRP $10,000.  Electronic Still Video, Folio, 1 February 1991, p75.  Digital Photography, Mikkel Aaland, 1992, p17.  We believe we were the first digital camera history web site to provide a photo and information concerning this camera. 

http://www.nikonweb.com/mvc5000/
 
http://www.home.eznet.net/~fshippey/newmedia/nm_dcam.pdf



sony mvr-5500a still video player 1989

Sony MVR-5500A

SONY CCD-TR55 - 1989.  Sony's first Handycam, 8mm video camera.

FOR MORE INFO CLICK HERE

 

nishka n8000 3d camera  1989

NISHIKA N8000 - 1989.   Nimslo, a manufacture of inexpensive 3D cameras, went bankrupt and was partly sold to a Nevada company called Nishika . In April 1989, Nishika introduced the four lens Nishika N8000 and later the four lens N9000. The N8000 featured a plastic body with plastic lenses, a fixed 1/60 shutter speed and a 3 position manual aperture lever that that selected f8, f11 and f19.

http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Nimslo

 


fujix ds-x memory card digital camera 1989
FUJI DS-X - 1989.   Memory card camera.  Follow up of the 1988 DS-1P and the first consumer / professional handheld digital camera sold to the public and which stored digital images on a flash card. 2/3-inch 400K CCD.  15mm f/3.5 lens.  Shutter 1/30 to 1/500 second.  Built-in flash.  $20,000 for complete system, including player and DAT electronic picture file.  Understanding Electronic Photography, John J. Larish, 1990, p46.  Popular Photography.  December 1991.  Page 111.  We believe we were the first digital camera history web site to provide a photo and information concerning this camera.

FOR MORE INFO CLICK HERE


  toshiba imc-100 memory card digital camera 1989  toshiba imc-100 memory card digital camera specs 1989  
TOSHIBA IMC-100 - 1989.  Similar to the Fuji DS-X above (cameras were supposedly jointly developed by Toshiba and Fuji. 2/3-inch 400K pixel CCD, prototype still digital memory card camera.  Images were captured on a credit-card-sized removable memory card. Auto white balance, built-in flash, built-in macro, 5 images per second burst.  Used IC-18s-18MB memory card with six-image capacity in high resolution mode.  Continous shooting up to five frames per second.  Understanding Electronic Photography, John J. Larish, 1990, p47.  A Toshiba press release at the time contained a drawing of what Tosiba described as "The Applications of the Toshiba Digital Card Camera System".  At the center of the drawing was the camera shown above.    We believe we were the first digital camera history web site to provide a drawing and information concerning this camera.

http://www.digicammuseum.com/en/prototypes-rarities/item/toshiba-imc-100


http://toshiba-mirai-kagakukan.jp/en/index.htm

toshiba ic-100 memory card digital camera 1989

TOSHIBA IC-100 - 1989.  Images were captured on a credit-card-sized removable memory card. The card held up to thirteen images and could be transferred to Toshiba's digital audio tape (DAT) recorder. Up to to 1,600 photos could be stored on one 120-minute DAT cassette tape. Popular Science, December 1989. Photo provided by Mike Mozart of JeepersMedia.    We believe we were the first digital camera history web site to provide a photo and information concerning this camera.

http://www.youtube.com/user/JeepersMedia

http://www.digicammuseum.com/en/prototypes-rarities/item/toshiba-ic100


TOSHIBA SK-3D7 -1989.  World's first first stereoscopic video camera using two lenses and CCDs.  Can be seen in the Toshiba Science Museum.

FOR MORE INFO CLICK HERE


VIVITAR - 1989.  Still video camera prototype called the V-2000.  Images recorded to floppy disk.  360K CCD.  Selectable 9mm f/2 or 16mm f/2.5 lens.  Auto-white balance and built-in flash. Understanding Electronic Photography, John J. Larish, 1990, p20 and p42. (Photo not available).  We believe we were the first digital camera history web site to provide a photo and information concerning this camera.

http://www.digicammuseum.com/en/prototypes-rarities/item/vivitar-v-2000

1989
 

1800s
1900 - 1920
1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980-83
1984-85
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995 A-C
1995 D-Z
1996 A-C
1996 D-N
1996 O-R
1996 S-Z
 1997 A-D
1997 E-H
1997 I-O
 1997 P-Q
 1997 R-S
1997 T-Z
1998 A-D
1998 E-F
1998 G-K
1998 L-N
1998 O-P
1998 Q-R
1998 S
1998 T-Z
1999+
   



Useful Info
History Sites
FINDER